Saturday, July 12, 2008

The Kissing Bridge


I mentioned that work will be taking me on some road trips in future. On Thursday I was in Carleton County, one of the prettiest areas of the province. I've written about this region before. I was in Woodstock (very near the Maine border), then took a little side-trip to Hartland, home of the World's Longest Covered Bridge.


They're doing work on the bridge now (preservation and repair work on the interior) which means that there was a flag woman at each end. However, to the best of my recollection, this bridge always operates on one-way traffic at a time; you drive up, peek in, and if there's something coming the other way, you wait until they come through before starting in. Or maybe the locals pass each other inside, I dunno.
The repairs also meant that as I drove through the bridge, there were contractors busily working on either side of my car, making it feel a bit like a drive through a very old factory.
Some of you may already know that these bridges were also called "kissing bridges" because they afforded a rare chance for privacy as a couple passed through in their horse and carriage.

It's really long! (390 metres [1,282 feet]!)






I continued on for meetings in Florenceville which, if not the prettiest little town in New Brunswick, is on the top ten.




I didn't have much time to stop for photos but did want to share a couple of the Saint John River, which bisects Florenceville, as it looks from Main Street. The river is narrow, calm and idyllic here, as if it's in no hurry to leave the little town behind and continue its headlong rush to Saint John and the Bay of Fundy.

Next week? I'm headed off to my old nemesis, Moncton. Hopefully no snowstorms, slippery streets and -30 temperatures this time!


ronnie

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7 Comments:

Blogger Carl said...

If you get -30 temps and snowstorms in July, check your GPS, you have taken a wrong turn and are now in Southern Argentina, or possibly Chile.

12:32 p.m.  
Blogger Xtreme English said...

beautiful photos...i can feel the sun and serenity way down here. that is one LOOOOONG bridge!!

thanks for such a lovely post!

6:10 p.m.  
Anonymous Dann said...

At 390 metres, I would think that they'd have a shot at a little more than kissing.

[wink][wink][nudge][nudge]

Watch out for the moose, too!

Regards,
Dann

10:24 p.m.  
Blogger Sherwood Harrington said...

I thoroughly enjoy all of the pictures in this post, but especially the two of the St. John. They remind me a little of the Chenango or the Boyne, but it's a little bigger than either one of them. Equally serene in these shots, though.

The long covered bridge pix reminded me right away of two of my Dad's slides that I restored/reconstructed just a while ago. Like your very long one, it is more than one span (but only barely more). The bridge is one of many in the Pennsylvania Dutch country, near Lancaster, and the slides (which can be seen here and here) were taken in 1962.

Thanks for the enjoyment, ronnie!

11:15 p.m.  
Anonymous Senthil said...

I like your photos. I haven't been to Canada and would like to go there someday. I heard it's a beautiful place.

3:05 p.m.  
Blogger Nostalgic for the Pleistocene said...

Beautiful photos of what looks like a perfect day - taken, i guess, with that nifty little blackberry thingamajig?

6:02 p.m.  
Blogger ronnie said...

Thanks to everyone for the nice comments.

Carl, I always wanted to see the Andes...

XE, it feels even longer when you're creeping through trying not to pin a carpenter to a wall!!

Dann, I'm guessing the same thought entered many a farmer's son's head!

Sherwood, glad I jogged a memory. I'm going to check those photos out right now.

Senthill, I'd love to know where you are writing from. I hope you do get to visit Canada.

NFTP, you're right - these are courtesy the Blackberry. It's a 2 megapixel camera. I find the picture quality varies widely (or maybe that's the photographer quality) but I was happy at the way these turned out.

8:13 p.m.  

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